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Find and Reuse Images: Painless Attribution

nathan, October 4th, 2010

Finding CC licensed images and using them properly is something many people seem to struggle with: finding them can be straight-forward, but many sites don’t provide copy and paste reuse code that complies with the license. Xpert, a project of University of Nottingham, has launched an image search tool that helps with this. Xpert Attribution tool searches Wikimedia Commons and Flickr and provides an easy way to get the image with the attribution information overlaid, or (even better, in my opinion) with RDFa suitable for embedding. I’ve combined the two below (downloading the image with attribution, and adding the structured-data enriched embed code below it).

Taken from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/eb/-_Schlumbergera_trunctata_-.jpg on 2010-10-05
Original URL – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:-_Schlumbergera_trunctata_-.jpg created on February 2007
Nino Barbieri CC BY-SA 2.5

The inclusion of structured data with the HTML means you can click the license link above and the license deed will display the attribution information, as well as our generated attribution HTML.

2 Responses to “Find and Reuse Images: Painless Attribution”

  1. rpcutts says:

    I’ll often use cc-by images for blog articles.
    The way I attribute is to put a line at the end of the article saying “photography by Mr Smith CC-BY” linking to where I got the image.

    Is this acceptable?
    The issue Is have with the methods above is that they would compromise the design of the page/article.

  2. Nathan Yergler says:

    The license doesn’t require specific formatting for attribution, but does require that you link to the original source (or alternative URL provided by the creator), and specify the creator (or alternate name specified), and the license you used it under. Sounds like you’re doing that.

    Note that the structured data included with the HTML above does help people further re-using the work. You could consider using Xpert as a way to generate the HTML, then separate the image from the attribution text.